Astro-Jae-Nomy
Astronomy, science and stuff.
Astro-Jae-Nomy
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distant-traveller:


Aurora over a glacier lagoon
Image credit and copyright: James Woodend, UK
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tessaviolet:

bekah-bo0m:

broccoleafveins:

Ye olde Windows screen savers.

I FEEL OLD

childhood video games
tessaviolet:

bekah-bo0m:

broccoleafveins:

Ye olde Windows screen savers.

I FEEL OLD

childhood video games
tessaviolet:

bekah-bo0m:

broccoleafveins:

Ye olde Windows screen savers.

I FEEL OLD

childhood video games
tessaviolet:

bekah-bo0m:

broccoleafveins:

Ye olde Windows screen savers.

I FEEL OLD

childhood video games
tessaviolet:

bekah-bo0m:

broccoleafveins:

Ye olde Windows screen savers.

I FEEL OLD

childhood video games
tessaviolet:

bekah-bo0m:

broccoleafveins:

Ye olde Windows screen savers.

I FEEL OLD

childhood video games
tessaviolet:

bekah-bo0m:

broccoleafveins:

Ye olde Windows screen savers.

I FEEL OLD

childhood video games
tessaviolet:

bekah-bo0m:

broccoleafveins:

Ye olde Windows screen savers.

I FEEL OLD

childhood video games
tessaviolet:

bekah-bo0m:

broccoleafveins:

Ye olde Windows screen savers.

I FEEL OLD

childhood video games
tessaviolet:

bekah-bo0m:

broccoleafveins:

Ye olde Windows screen savers.

I FEEL OLD

childhood video games
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biomedicalephemera:

Check out these awesome dinosaurs. All pretty and baller and songbirdy and stuff!
Yup, birds are dinos. There are “avian dinosaurs” (Saurischia), which have hips that have legs sticking straight out underneath them, and “non-avian dinosaurs” (Orthischia - confusingly, translates as “bird-hipped”), which have legs that splayed out to the sides. Birds first appeared during the Jurassic period, 150 million years ago, and they’re the only surviving member of the Dinosauria clade.
All carnivorous dinosaurs were warm-blooded, and were Saurischians. One of the two primary herbivorous dinosaur lines is also Saurischian - the Sauropodopmorpha (including Apatosaurus, Diplodocus, and Argentinosaurus) branched off around 230 mya, but well-known dinosaurs such as triceratops and stegosaurus are comparatively unrelated to modern birds.
Birds: The Late Evolution of Dinosaurs.
Dinobuzz: Are birds really dinosaurs?Images:
Giant Heron and Sea EaglePied Hornbill, Andean Condor, Leadbeater’s Cockatooxkcd: Birds and DinosaursOstrich, Weaver BirdsRock Penguin, Roseate Spoonbill, Greater FlamingoWild Life of the World. Richard Lydekker, 1916.
biomedicalephemera:

Check out these awesome dinosaurs. All pretty and baller and songbirdy and stuff!
Yup, birds are dinos. There are “avian dinosaurs” (Saurischia), which have hips that have legs sticking straight out underneath them, and “non-avian dinosaurs” (Orthischia - confusingly, translates as “bird-hipped”), which have legs that splayed out to the sides. Birds first appeared during the Jurassic period, 150 million years ago, and they’re the only surviving member of the Dinosauria clade.
All carnivorous dinosaurs were warm-blooded, and were Saurischians. One of the two primary herbivorous dinosaur lines is also Saurischian - the Sauropodopmorpha (including Apatosaurus, Diplodocus, and Argentinosaurus) branched off around 230 mya, but well-known dinosaurs such as triceratops and stegosaurus are comparatively unrelated to modern birds.
Birds: The Late Evolution of Dinosaurs.
Dinobuzz: Are birds really dinosaurs?Images:
Giant Heron and Sea EaglePied Hornbill, Andean Condor, Leadbeater’s Cockatooxkcd: Birds and DinosaursOstrich, Weaver BirdsRock Penguin, Roseate Spoonbill, Greater FlamingoWild Life of the World. Richard Lydekker, 1916.
biomedicalephemera:

Check out these awesome dinosaurs. All pretty and baller and songbirdy and stuff!
Yup, birds are dinos. There are “avian dinosaurs” (Saurischia), which have hips that have legs sticking straight out underneath them, and “non-avian dinosaurs” (Orthischia - confusingly, translates as “bird-hipped”), which have legs that splayed out to the sides. Birds first appeared during the Jurassic period, 150 million years ago, and they’re the only surviving member of the Dinosauria clade.
All carnivorous dinosaurs were warm-blooded, and were Saurischians. One of the two primary herbivorous dinosaur lines is also Saurischian - the Sauropodopmorpha (including Apatosaurus, Diplodocus, and Argentinosaurus) branched off around 230 mya, but well-known dinosaurs such as triceratops and stegosaurus are comparatively unrelated to modern birds.
Birds: The Late Evolution of Dinosaurs.
Dinobuzz: Are birds really dinosaurs?Images:
Giant Heron and Sea EaglePied Hornbill, Andean Condor, Leadbeater’s Cockatooxkcd: Birds and DinosaursOstrich, Weaver BirdsRock Penguin, Roseate Spoonbill, Greater FlamingoWild Life of the World. Richard Lydekker, 1916.
biomedicalephemera:

Check out these awesome dinosaurs. All pretty and baller and songbirdy and stuff!
Yup, birds are dinos. There are “avian dinosaurs” (Saurischia), which have hips that have legs sticking straight out underneath them, and “non-avian dinosaurs” (Orthischia - confusingly, translates as “bird-hipped”), which have legs that splayed out to the sides. Birds first appeared during the Jurassic period, 150 million years ago, and they’re the only surviving member of the Dinosauria clade.
All carnivorous dinosaurs were warm-blooded, and were Saurischians. One of the two primary herbivorous dinosaur lines is also Saurischian - the Sauropodopmorpha (including Apatosaurus, Diplodocus, and Argentinosaurus) branched off around 230 mya, but well-known dinosaurs such as triceratops and stegosaurus are comparatively unrelated to modern birds.
Birds: The Late Evolution of Dinosaurs.
Dinobuzz: Are birds really dinosaurs?Images:
Giant Heron and Sea EaglePied Hornbill, Andean Condor, Leadbeater’s Cockatooxkcd: Birds and DinosaursOstrich, Weaver BirdsRock Penguin, Roseate Spoonbill, Greater FlamingoWild Life of the World. Richard Lydekker, 1916.
biomedicalephemera:

Check out these awesome dinosaurs. All pretty and baller and songbirdy and stuff!
Yup, birds are dinos. There are “avian dinosaurs” (Saurischia), which have hips that have legs sticking straight out underneath them, and “non-avian dinosaurs” (Orthischia - confusingly, translates as “bird-hipped”), which have legs that splayed out to the sides. Birds first appeared during the Jurassic period, 150 million years ago, and they’re the only surviving member of the Dinosauria clade.
All carnivorous dinosaurs were warm-blooded, and were Saurischians. One of the two primary herbivorous dinosaur lines is also Saurischian - the Sauropodopmorpha (including Apatosaurus, Diplodocus, and Argentinosaurus) branched off around 230 mya, but well-known dinosaurs such as triceratops and stegosaurus are comparatively unrelated to modern birds.
Birds: The Late Evolution of Dinosaurs.
Dinobuzz: Are birds really dinosaurs?Images:
Giant Heron and Sea EaglePied Hornbill, Andean Condor, Leadbeater’s Cockatooxkcd: Birds and DinosaursOstrich, Weaver BirdsRock Penguin, Roseate Spoonbill, Greater FlamingoWild Life of the World. Richard Lydekker, 1916.
biomedicalephemera:

Check out these awesome dinosaurs. All pretty and baller and songbirdy and stuff!
Yup, birds are dinos. There are “avian dinosaurs” (Saurischia), which have hips that have legs sticking straight out underneath them, and “non-avian dinosaurs” (Orthischia - confusingly, translates as “bird-hipped”), which have legs that splayed out to the sides. Birds first appeared during the Jurassic period, 150 million years ago, and they’re the only surviving member of the Dinosauria clade.
All carnivorous dinosaurs were warm-blooded, and were Saurischians. One of the two primary herbivorous dinosaur lines is also Saurischian - the Sauropodopmorpha (including Apatosaurus, Diplodocus, and Argentinosaurus) branched off around 230 mya, but well-known dinosaurs such as triceratops and stegosaurus are comparatively unrelated to modern birds.
Birds: The Late Evolution of Dinosaurs.
Dinobuzz: Are birds really dinosaurs?Images:
Giant Heron and Sea EaglePied Hornbill, Andean Condor, Leadbeater’s Cockatooxkcd: Birds and DinosaursOstrich, Weaver BirdsRock Penguin, Roseate Spoonbill, Greater FlamingoWild Life of the World. Richard Lydekker, 1916.
biomedicalephemera:

Check out these awesome dinosaurs. All pretty and baller and songbirdy and stuff!
Yup, birds are dinos. There are “avian dinosaurs” (Saurischia), which have hips that have legs sticking straight out underneath them, and “non-avian dinosaurs” (Orthischia - confusingly, translates as “bird-hipped”), which have legs that splayed out to the sides. Birds first appeared during the Jurassic period, 150 million years ago, and they’re the only surviving member of the Dinosauria clade.
All carnivorous dinosaurs were warm-blooded, and were Saurischians. One of the two primary herbivorous dinosaur lines is also Saurischian - the Sauropodopmorpha (including Apatosaurus, Diplodocus, and Argentinosaurus) branched off around 230 mya, but well-known dinosaurs such as triceratops and stegosaurus are comparatively unrelated to modern birds.
Birds: The Late Evolution of Dinosaurs.
Dinobuzz: Are birds really dinosaurs?Images:
Giant Heron and Sea EaglePied Hornbill, Andean Condor, Leadbeater’s Cockatooxkcd: Birds and DinosaursOstrich, Weaver BirdsRock Penguin, Roseate Spoonbill, Greater FlamingoWild Life of the World. Richard Lydekker, 1916.
biomedicalephemera:

Check out these awesome dinosaurs. All pretty and baller and songbirdy and stuff!
Yup, birds are dinos. There are “avian dinosaurs” (Saurischia), which have hips that have legs sticking straight out underneath them, and “non-avian dinosaurs” (Orthischia - confusingly, translates as “bird-hipped”), which have legs that splayed out to the sides. Birds first appeared during the Jurassic period, 150 million years ago, and they’re the only surviving member of the Dinosauria clade.
All carnivorous dinosaurs were warm-blooded, and were Saurischians. One of the two primary herbivorous dinosaur lines is also Saurischian - the Sauropodopmorpha (including Apatosaurus, Diplodocus, and Argentinosaurus) branched off around 230 mya, but well-known dinosaurs such as triceratops and stegosaurus are comparatively unrelated to modern birds.
Birds: The Late Evolution of Dinosaurs.
Dinobuzz: Are birds really dinosaurs?Images:
Giant Heron and Sea EaglePied Hornbill, Andean Condor, Leadbeater’s Cockatooxkcd: Birds and DinosaursOstrich, Weaver BirdsRock Penguin, Roseate Spoonbill, Greater FlamingoWild Life of the World. Richard Lydekker, 1916.
biomedicalephemera:

Check out these awesome dinosaurs. All pretty and baller and songbirdy and stuff!
Yup, birds are dinos. There are “avian dinosaurs” (Saurischia), which have hips that have legs sticking straight out underneath them, and “non-avian dinosaurs” (Orthischia - confusingly, translates as “bird-hipped”), which have legs that splayed out to the sides. Birds first appeared during the Jurassic period, 150 million years ago, and they’re the only surviving member of the Dinosauria clade.
All carnivorous dinosaurs were warm-blooded, and were Saurischians. One of the two primary herbivorous dinosaur lines is also Saurischian - the Sauropodopmorpha (including Apatosaurus, Diplodocus, and Argentinosaurus) branched off around 230 mya, but well-known dinosaurs such as triceratops and stegosaurus are comparatively unrelated to modern birds.
Birds: The Late Evolution of Dinosaurs.
Dinobuzz: Are birds really dinosaurs?Images:
Giant Heron and Sea EaglePied Hornbill, Andean Condor, Leadbeater’s Cockatooxkcd: Birds and DinosaursOstrich, Weaver BirdsRock Penguin, Roseate Spoonbill, Greater FlamingoWild Life of the World. Richard Lydekker, 1916.
biomedicalephemera:

Check out these awesome dinosaurs. All pretty and baller and songbirdy and stuff!
Yup, birds are dinos. There are “avian dinosaurs” (Saurischia), which have hips that have legs sticking straight out underneath them, and “non-avian dinosaurs” (Orthischia - confusingly, translates as “bird-hipped”), which have legs that splayed out to the sides. Birds first appeared during the Jurassic period, 150 million years ago, and they’re the only surviving member of the Dinosauria clade.
All carnivorous dinosaurs were warm-blooded, and were Saurischians. One of the two primary herbivorous dinosaur lines is also Saurischian - the Sauropodopmorpha (including Apatosaurus, Diplodocus, and Argentinosaurus) branched off around 230 mya, but well-known dinosaurs such as triceratops and stegosaurus are comparatively unrelated to modern birds.
Birds: The Late Evolution of Dinosaurs.
Dinobuzz: Are birds really dinosaurs?Images:
Giant Heron and Sea EaglePied Hornbill, Andean Condor, Leadbeater’s Cockatooxkcd: Birds and DinosaursOstrich, Weaver BirdsRock Penguin, Roseate Spoonbill, Greater FlamingoWild Life of the World. Richard Lydekker, 1916.
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simplyspace:

Going Out With The Stars
“I’m coming back in… and it’s the saddest moment of my life.”
— Ed White, expressing his sorrow at the conclusion of the first American spacewalk during the Gemini 4 mission on the 3rd of June 1965.
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spaceplasma:

Dark Gamma Ray Bursts

An artist’s conception of the environment around GRB 020819B based on ALMA observations. The GRB occurred in an arm of a galaxy in the constellation of Pisces (The Fishes). GRBs are huge explosions of a star spouting high-speed jets in a direction toward the observer. In a complete surprise, less gas was observed than expected, and correspondingly much more dust, making some GRBs appear as “dark GRBs”.
Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are intense bursts of extremely high energy observed in distant galaxies — the brightest explosive phenomenon in the Universe. Bursts that last more than a couple of seconds are known as long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) and are associated with supernova explosions — powerful detonations at the ends of the lives of massive stars.
In just a matter of seconds, a typical burst releases as much energy as the Sun will in its entire ten-billion-year lifetime. The explosion itself is often followed by a slowly fading emission, known as an afterglow, which is thought to be created by collisions between the ejected material and the surrounding gas. However, some gamma-ray bursts mysteriously seem to have no afterglow — they are referred to as dark bursts. One possible explanation is that clouds of dust absorb the afterglow radiation.

More information: here
Credit: Bunyo Hatsukade(NAOJ), ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO)
spaceplasma:

Dark Gamma Ray Bursts

An artist’s conception of the environment around GRB 020819B based on ALMA observations. The GRB occurred in an arm of a galaxy in the constellation of Pisces (The Fishes). GRBs are huge explosions of a star spouting high-speed jets in a direction toward the observer. In a complete surprise, less gas was observed than expected, and correspondingly much more dust, making some GRBs appear as “dark GRBs”.
Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are intense bursts of extremely high energy observed in distant galaxies — the brightest explosive phenomenon in the Universe. Bursts that last more than a couple of seconds are known as long-duration gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) and are associated with supernova explosions — powerful detonations at the ends of the lives of massive stars.
In just a matter of seconds, a typical burst releases as much energy as the Sun will in its entire ten-billion-year lifetime. The explosion itself is often followed by a slowly fading emission, known as an afterglow, which is thought to be created by collisions between the ejected material and the surrounding gas. However, some gamma-ray bursts mysteriously seem to have no afterglow — they are referred to as dark bursts. One possible explanation is that clouds of dust absorb the afterglow radiation.

More information: here
Credit: Bunyo Hatsukade(NAOJ), ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO)
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fuckyeah-nerdery:

thescienceofjohnlock:

sherlocksaysjawn:

kriskenshin:

imalloutofmilk:

Definition of College life.

I thought that was Spock

Even Spock can’t handle this illogical shit

I saw Spock too

Kirk: “Is he dead, Bones?”
McCoy: “No, but with all that student debt he’ll owe, he may as well be.”
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sixpenceee:

Scientists at Argonne National Laboratory have discovered a way to use sound waves to levitate individual droplets of solutions (Video)
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startswithabang:

The Ten Brightest Stars in the Sky

"When that happens, your star starts burning heavier elements, expanding into a giant star that’s cooler but much more luminous than your initial star. Even though the giant phase is much shorter-lived than the hydrogen-burning phase, its incredible brightness allows it to be seen prominently from far greater distances than the original star ever could be."

When you think of the most recognizable collections of stars: the Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, the “Teapot” in Sagittarius and the Southern Cross, they might have prominent stars, but none of them crack the top 10 in terms of brightness. Who, then, are the brightest stars in the sky? Come see how many you know, and find what makes them shine so brightly, and why they’re not representative of most stars in the Universe!
startswithabang:

The Ten Brightest Stars in the Sky

"When that happens, your star starts burning heavier elements, expanding into a giant star that’s cooler but much more luminous than your initial star. Even though the giant phase is much shorter-lived than the hydrogen-burning phase, its incredible brightness allows it to be seen prominently from far greater distances than the original star ever could be."

When you think of the most recognizable collections of stars: the Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, the “Teapot” in Sagittarius and the Southern Cross, they might have prominent stars, but none of them crack the top 10 in terms of brightness. Who, then, are the brightest stars in the sky? Come see how many you know, and find what makes them shine so brightly, and why they’re not representative of most stars in the Universe!
startswithabang:

The Ten Brightest Stars in the Sky

"When that happens, your star starts burning heavier elements, expanding into a giant star that’s cooler but much more luminous than your initial star. Even though the giant phase is much shorter-lived than the hydrogen-burning phase, its incredible brightness allows it to be seen prominently from far greater distances than the original star ever could be."

When you think of the most recognizable collections of stars: the Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, the “Teapot” in Sagittarius and the Southern Cross, they might have prominent stars, but none of them crack the top 10 in terms of brightness. Who, then, are the brightest stars in the sky? Come see how many you know, and find what makes them shine so brightly, and why they’re not representative of most stars in the Universe!
startswithabang:

The Ten Brightest Stars in the Sky

"When that happens, your star starts burning heavier elements, expanding into a giant star that’s cooler but much more luminous than your initial star. Even though the giant phase is much shorter-lived than the hydrogen-burning phase, its incredible brightness allows it to be seen prominently from far greater distances than the original star ever could be."

When you think of the most recognizable collections of stars: the Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, the “Teapot” in Sagittarius and the Southern Cross, they might have prominent stars, but none of them crack the top 10 in terms of brightness. Who, then, are the brightest stars in the sky? Come see how many you know, and find what makes them shine so brightly, and why they’re not representative of most stars in the Universe!
startswithabang:

The Ten Brightest Stars in the Sky

"When that happens, your star starts burning heavier elements, expanding into a giant star that’s cooler but much more luminous than your initial star. Even though the giant phase is much shorter-lived than the hydrogen-burning phase, its incredible brightness allows it to be seen prominently from far greater distances than the original star ever could be."

When you think of the most recognizable collections of stars: the Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, the “Teapot” in Sagittarius and the Southern Cross, they might have prominent stars, but none of them crack the top 10 in terms of brightness. Who, then, are the brightest stars in the sky? Come see how many you know, and find what makes them shine so brightly, and why they’re not representative of most stars in the Universe!
startswithabang:

The Ten Brightest Stars in the Sky

"When that happens, your star starts burning heavier elements, expanding into a giant star that’s cooler but much more luminous than your initial star. Even though the giant phase is much shorter-lived than the hydrogen-burning phase, its incredible brightness allows it to be seen prominently from far greater distances than the original star ever could be."

When you think of the most recognizable collections of stars: the Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, the “Teapot” in Sagittarius and the Southern Cross, they might have prominent stars, but none of them crack the top 10 in terms of brightness. Who, then, are the brightest stars in the sky? Come see how many you know, and find what makes them shine so brightly, and why they’re not representative of most stars in the Universe!
startswithabang:

The Ten Brightest Stars in the Sky

"When that happens, your star starts burning heavier elements, expanding into a giant star that’s cooler but much more luminous than your initial star. Even though the giant phase is much shorter-lived than the hydrogen-burning phase, its incredible brightness allows it to be seen prominently from far greater distances than the original star ever could be."

When you think of the most recognizable collections of stars: the Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, the “Teapot” in Sagittarius and the Southern Cross, they might have prominent stars, but none of them crack the top 10 in terms of brightness. Who, then, are the brightest stars in the sky? Come see how many you know, and find what makes them shine so brightly, and why they’re not representative of most stars in the Universe!
startswithabang:

The Ten Brightest Stars in the Sky

"When that happens, your star starts burning heavier elements, expanding into a giant star that’s cooler but much more luminous than your initial star. Even though the giant phase is much shorter-lived than the hydrogen-burning phase, its incredible brightness allows it to be seen prominently from far greater distances than the original star ever could be."

When you think of the most recognizable collections of stars: the Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, the “Teapot” in Sagittarius and the Southern Cross, they might have prominent stars, but none of them crack the top 10 in terms of brightness. Who, then, are the brightest stars in the sky? Come see how many you know, and find what makes them shine so brightly, and why they’re not representative of most stars in the Universe!
startswithabang:

The Ten Brightest Stars in the Sky

"When that happens, your star starts burning heavier elements, expanding into a giant star that’s cooler but much more luminous than your initial star. Even though the giant phase is much shorter-lived than the hydrogen-burning phase, its incredible brightness allows it to be seen prominently from far greater distances than the original star ever could be."

When you think of the most recognizable collections of stars: the Big Dipper, Cassiopeia, the “Teapot” in Sagittarius and the Southern Cross, they might have prominent stars, but none of them crack the top 10 in terms of brightness. Who, then, are the brightest stars in the sky? Come see how many you know, and find what makes them shine so brightly, and why they’re not representative of most stars in the Universe!
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astronomicalwonders:

A Deep Look into a Dark Sky
"Can you count the number of bright dots in this picture? This crowded frame is a deep-field image obtained using the Wide Field Imager (WFI), a camera mounted on a relatively modestly sized telescope, the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre located at the La Silla Observatory, Chile.
This image is one of five patches of sky covered by the COMBO-17 survey (Classifying Objects by Medium-Band Observations in 17 filters), a deep search for cosmic objects in a relatively narrow area of the southern hemisphere’s sky. Each one of the five patches is recorded using 17 individual colour filters. Each one of the five COMBO-17 images covers an area of the sky the size of the full Moon. [read more]”
Credit: ESO/COMBO-17
astronomicalwonders:

A Deep Look into a Dark Sky
"Can you count the number of bright dots in this picture? This crowded frame is a deep-field image obtained using the Wide Field Imager (WFI), a camera mounted on a relatively modestly sized telescope, the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre located at the La Silla Observatory, Chile.
This image is one of five patches of sky covered by the COMBO-17 survey (Classifying Objects by Medium-Band Observations in 17 filters), a deep search for cosmic objects in a relatively narrow area of the southern hemisphere’s sky. Each one of the five patches is recorded using 17 individual colour filters. Each one of the five COMBO-17 images covers an area of the sky the size of the full Moon. [read more]”
Credit: ESO/COMBO-17